Home > Electoral history, Irish politics > Fate of government parties after coalition

Fate of government parties after coalition

We hear a lot about the fate of coalition partners after coalitions, particularly that of junior parties. Here is a full breakdown of how parties have fared in the elections after coalition.

Inter-Party government 1948–51

Comprised of 31 Fine Gael, 14 Labour, 10 Clann na Poblachta, 7 Clann na Talmhan, 5 National Labour, with the support of 8 Independents. Fine Gael had been on a downward trend since its first election in 1937 and the government gave it a real lease of life.

National Labour folded back into Labour in 1950.

After the fall of the government in 1951, Fine Gael increased to 40 (+9), while all smaller parties lost seats. Labour got 16 (-3), Clann na Talmhan 6 (-1) and Clann na Poblachta 2 (-8).

Inter-Party government 1954–57

In 1954, 50 Fine Gael, 19 Labour, 5 Clann na Talmhan.

In 1957, all parties lost seats: 40 Fine Gael (-10), 12 Labour (-7), 3 Clann na Talmhan (-2)

Fine Gael–Labour 1973–77

In 1973, it started 54 Fine Gael and 19 Labour.

In 1977, both parties fell: 43 Fine Gael (-11) and 17 Labour (-2).

Fine Gael–Labour 1981–82

Started in June 1981 with 65 Fine Gael and 15 Labour. Was always a minority government, it initially had the support of Jim Kemmy, while four Independents and small party representatives tactically abstained, until the January 1982 budget vote.

In the February 1982 election, Fine Gael fell to 63 (-2), while Labour had no change at 15.

Fine Gael–Labour 1982–87

In 1982, 70 Fine Gael and 16 Labour.

In 1987, a dreadful result for both parties, 51 Fine Gael (-19) and 12 Labour (-4). The emergent Progressive Democrats took support from Fine Gael and pushed Labour into fourth place.

Fianna Fáil–Progressive Democrats 1989–92

In 1989, 77 Fianna Fáil and 6 Progressive Democrats.

In 1992, the PDs became the first junior coalition party to increase its seats after an election. Between the two parties in 1992, they had 68 Fianna Fáil (-9) and 10 Progressive Democrats (+4).

Fianna Fáil–Labour 1993–94

Fine Gael–Labour–Democratic Left 1994–97

The 27th Dáil saw two governments. Political legend has it that Labour lost support because they went into government with Fianna Fáil. But according to Pat Leahy’s Showtime, their support was still high in November 1994. If this is true, then it was their political promiscuity rather than their support for Fianna Fáil as such that hurt them.

Overall figures for 1992 saw 68 Fianna Fáil, 45 Fine Gael, 33 Labour, 10 Progressive Democrats, 4 Democratic Left, 1 Green and 5 Independents.

In 1997, Labour and the PDs lost out: 77 Fianna Fáil (+9), 54 Fine Gael (+9), 17 Labour (-16), 4 Progressive Democrats (-6), 2 Green (+1), 1 Sinn Féin, 1 Socialist and 6 Independents (+1)

Fianna Fáil–Progressive Democrats 1997–2002

After a full term, both parties increased their seats: 81 Fianna Fáil (+4) and 8 Progressive Democrats (+4). Again the PDs proved the only junior party to increase seats after government.

Fianna Fáil–Progressive Democrats 2002–07

Of course, the PDs were not so lucky the third time they entered an election while in government. In 2007, both parties fell to 78 Fianna Fáil (-3) and 2 Progressive Democrats (-6).

Fianna Fáil–Green Party–Progressive Democrats 2007–11

Bertie Ahern formed a government in 2007 comprised on 78 Fianna Fáil, 6 Greens and 2 Progressive Democrats and the support of 4 Independents. The PDs were on our last legs anyway at the formation of the government, and we voted to dissolve in November 2008. And then nine days ago, Fianna Fáil fell to 20 seats (-58) while all six Greens lost their seats.

 

So across all coalitions, only twice had the junior party made gains at the next election, the Progressive Democrats in 1992 and 2002. And that party’s later electoral record is probably not something anyone would wish to cling to as a hopeful outcome. Having said that, none of this can inform of the counterfactuals, how a party would have fared at a subsequent election had they stayed out of government.

About these ads
  1. 6 March, 2011 at 2:24 pm

    And in both those elections, the PDs had a lower share of the national vote. It was just lucky or clever vote management which got them more seats…

    • William
      8 March, 2011 at 7:51 am

      I do think we can put too much emphasis on first preference votes in analysing Irish elections. Seats are what matter and transfers do five us a chance to assess greater popularity. For example, I think it fair to argue that Fianna Fáil was more popular in 2002 than in 2007, despite the increase in first prefs. Open to interpretation, of course, but I think we do ignore the presence of transfers too often, say in addressing proportionality of STV. Also with small parties, how well they do is based on how well they concentrate resources, not overall share of vote, so I’d say even less relevant when comparing than with larger parties.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,607 other followers

%d bloggers like this: